Pink-edged Sulphur

Colias interior

Pink-edged Sulphurs are northern butterflies that are much more at home in the woods than their relatives, Orange and Clouded Sulphurs, which prefer more open areas. Its chief larval foods are blueberries.

It is not often an abundant species in Wisconsin; the group photo here is deceptive, as I saw more of this species puddling on the day that the picture was taken than I had previously seen in my life.

Weekly sightings for Pink-edged Sulphur

Identifying characteristics

Above, the wings are yellow with black marginal borders. The males have a solid black border and look very much like the Clouded Sulphur, while the females have a much-reduced border on the forewing and a no border on the hindwing. Below, the wings are a yellowish color with a single central spot and a distinct pink edge to the wings.

Similar species

Clouded Sulphur males are sometimes very similar including having a distinct pink edge to the wings, but below, the Pink-edged Sulphurs lack the faint row of black marginal spots and have just a single central spot.

Habitat

Prefers barren areas with blueberries, the host plant of this species.

Flight

This species has but a single brood and may be found from early June through August.

Abundance

More common as you move farther north. I have now seen over 50 puddling together on sandy soil.

Recent Pink-edged Sulphur Sightings

Date County Reported by
Jul 16, 2017 Oconto Douglas Buege
Jul 10, 2017 Wood Douglas Buege

Locations

Map showing sighting locations for Pink-edged Sulphur
Map key
Pink-edged SulphurClick to enlarge

Moquah Barrons, Bayfield Co., WI. July 1, 2008.

Pink-edged SulphurClick to enlarge

Moquah Barrons, Bayfield Co., WI. July 1, 2008.

Pink-edged SulphurClick to enlarge

Moquah Barrons, Bayfield Co., WI. June 30, 2008.

Pink-edged SulphurClick to enlarge

Crex Meadows, Burnett Co., WI. July 21, 2006.

Pink-edged SulphurClick to enlarge

Crex Meadows, Burnett Co., WI. July 21, 2006.