Zebra Swallowtail

Eurytides marcellus

The Zebra Swallowtail is an uncommon stray in Wisconsin, and may be looked for in the southern counties. Its larval food is the Pawpaw (Asimina triloba), which is not native to Wisconsin. Notice the difference between the fresh individuals from North Carolina and the rather worn specimen, missing part of a tail, that I took in Florida.

Weekly sightings for Zebra Swallowtail

Identifying characteristics

Above: White with black stripes, triangular wings, and a long tail. The sexes are nearly alike. Below: Similar to the top but with a red stripe bordered by black on the hindwing.

Similar species

This species should not be confused with any other Wisconsin butterfly.

Habitat

Open, brushy woodland areas where Pawpaw grows.

Flight

Two generations in northern Illinois: early May and then June/July. Ebner (1970) states that the best time to look for them in Wisconsin is June and early July.

Abundance

Rare. An unlikely stray in Wisconsin.

Late Zebra Swallowtail Sightings

Date County Reported by
Jul 7, 2019 Dane Jean Rawson
Jul 9, 2019 Dane Joan Braune
Jul 9, 2019 Dane Les M. Hoffman
Jul 10, 2019 Dane Douglas Buege
Aug 27, 2007 Milwaukee James E. Ebner

Locations

Map showing sighting locations for Zebra Swallowtail
Map key
Zebra SwallowtailClick to enlarge

Pettigrew State Park, Tyrrell Co., NC. March 26, 2007.

Zebra SwallowtailClick to enlarge

Pettigrew State Park, Tyrrell Co., NC. March 26, 2007.

Zebra SwallowtailClick to enlarge

Cedars of Lebanon State Forest, Wilson Co., TN. April 2, 2011.

Zebra SwallowtailClick to enlarge

Pettigrew State Park, Tyrrell Co., NC. March 26, 2007.

Zebra SwallowtailClick to enlarge

Well worn individual

Kissimmee Prairie Preserve, FL. March 25, 2005.