Spicebush Swallowtail

Papilio troilus

The Spicebush Swallowtail is an uncommon stray into Wisconsin. The main larval food plants of this species are Sassafras and Spicebush, neither of which is native to Wisconsin.

Weekly sightings for Spicebush Swallowtail

Identifying characteristics

Above: black with a row of marginal yellow/white spots; females are nearly identical to the males, although males are more likely to show a second partial row of spots on the forewing. Below: black, with two rows of yellow spots, the innermost row is interrupted in the middle by a blue spot.

Similar species

From below, this species could only be confused with the Black Swallowtail, which also has two rows of yellow spots. It can be distinguished from this species by the innermost row of yellow spots which is interrupted by a blue spot.

Habitat

Woodlands, and open areas near woodlands.

Flight

Two broods in northern Illinois; strays have occurred in Wisconsin mainly during June and July.

Abundance

A very rare stray to Wisconsin.

Late Spicebush Swallowtail Sightings

Date County Reported by

Locations

Map showing sighting locations for Spicebush Swallowtail
Map key
Spicebush SwallowtailClick to enlarge

Sand Ridge State Park, Mason Co., IL. August 30, 2010.

Spicebush SwallowtailClick to enlarge

Sand Ridge State Park, Mason Co., IL. August 29, 2010.

Spicebush SwallowtailClick to enlarge

Sand Ridge State Park, Mason Co., IL. August 29, 2010.

Spicebush SwallowtailClick to enlarge

Sand Ridge State Park, Mason Co., IL. August 28, 2010.

Spicebush SwallowtailClick to enlarge

Sand Ridge State Park, Mason Co., IL. August 29, 2010.

Spicebush SwallowtailClick to enlarge

Sand Ridge State Park, Mason Co., IL. August 28, 2010.