Efferia aestuans

At Schurch-Thompson Prairie in Iowa County, I really got my first look at why this species is considered one of the most likely to land on you as you walk through a field. All females that I saw laying eggs I tried to photograph, and everyone flew and landed on me. Several landed on my tripod and attempted to lay eggs on it. Once a female was flying around and landing on me and a male tried to mate with her and they were both flying right in front of my eyes. Later two males landed on my leg and I took the tripod off my camera and was able to take a photo of the male. It would be better to have a point and shoot camera with you to take photos of these species as they sit on you. Another time I had a female land on my tripod. I was able to sit the tripod down, take the camera off the tripod, and when I went to take the photo, the female flew off and captured the insect and flew back to the tripod where she ate her prey and tried to lay eggs on my tripod. Ron Arnold calls this species the friendly one and I certainly can see why. I have seen males but they have yet to be as cooperative as I would like.

Locations

Map showing sighting locations for Efferia aestuans
Map key
Efferia aestuansClick to enlarge

Efferia aestuans female laying eggs.

Peterson Creek Fishery Area, July 29, 2008.

Efferia aestuansClick to enlarge

Efferia aestuans male, close-up

Schurch-Thompson Prairie, July 20, 2008.

Efferia aestuansClick to enlarge

Efferia aestuans male on leg.

Schurch-Thompson Prairie, July 20, 2008.

Efferia aestuansClick to enlarge

Efferia aestuans laying eggs

Schurch-Thompson Prairie, July 20, 2008.

Efferia aestuansClick to enlarge

Efferia aestuans female laying eggs on echinacea pallida.

UW-Madison Arboretum, July 2, 2005.