Efferia albibarbis

This species is fairly common in open sanding areas, and along unpaved roads or trails throughout southern Wisconsin. Walking any of these drier trails in July, this species is just as likely to be seen as a tiger beetle flying up in front of you. In many robber flies, Herschel Raney thinks that the female is the most aggressive, but with this species it seems to be the male that takes the largest prey.

Locations

Map showing sighting locations for Efferia albibarbis
Map key
Efferia albibarbisClick to enlarge

Efferia albibarbis male with another mated robber fly as prey.

Emmons Creek Fishery Area, July 22, 2008.

Efferia albibarbisClick to enlarge

Efferia albibarbis with prey

Emmons Creek Fishery Area, July 22, 2008.

Efferia albibarbisClick to enlarge

Efferia albibarbis male with another robber fly (probably machimus sp.) as prey.

Greenwood Refuge, July 21, 2008.

Efferia albibarbisClick to enlarge

Efferia albibarbis male with an eastern forktail male (ischnura verticalis) as prey.

Germania Marsh Wildlife Area, August 1, 2007.

Efferia albibarbisClick to enlarge

Efferia albibarbis male with prey

Greenwood Refuge Wildlife Area, July 21, 2008.

Efferia albibarbisClick to enlarge

Efferia albibarbis female

South of Coloma, Chaffee Creek Fishery Area, July 6, 2007.